Kary Klismet’s Childhood Uniform Concepts

最新偷拍

最新偷拍If you’re a regular reader of the site, you’re surely familiar with the name Kary Klismet (that’s him at right). Kary is one of our most prolific Ticker contributors, plus he organized the Denver edition of last year’s Uni Watch 20th-anniversary party and more recently founded a Colorado-centric Uni Watch Facebook group.

Kary recently rediscovered a uniform project from his teens. I’ll let him tell you about it — take it away, Kary.

My Early Uniform Concepts
By Kary Klismet

In the summer of 1986, when I was 15, I visited the Baseball Hall of Fame for the first time during a family vacation. Seeing all the amazing artifacts and uniforms from baseball history kicked my previously casual sports fandom into overdrive.

I’d always loved to draw, so I turned that passion toward my newfound obsession with sports. This naturally progressed to creating uniform concepts. Around this time, I also concocted fictional sports leagues to enliven my backyard baseball and football games, so these imaginary teams became the vehicles for my early forays into uniform design.

I tried my hand at baseball uniforms first. Inspired by the uniform guides in the American and National Leagues’ Red and Green Books, I increasingly used those illustrations as visual reference for the uniforms I drew. You can see that influence in details like the jerseys’ tailored silhouettes and different sleeve styles [for this and all the images that follow, you can click to enlarge]:

After drawing the baseball uniforms freehand, I realized I could save time on my football uniform designs by creating a traceable template. For my master copy, I hand-drew most of the uniform elements, then traced a sticker of a 1970s-era NFL helmet with a two-bar facemask (a bit outdated by that point in the late ’80s, but I found it easier to replicate than more contemporary mask styles — and besides, a few players were still wearing them).

For team names, I often found inspiration from the teams’ geographic locations. I always loved cities that had unified themes across multiple sports teams — like how St. Louis had both a football and baseball team called the Cardinals — so I tried to create my own unified themes when possible. For my fictitious Cleveland teams, for example, I called the baseball team the Blades and named the football team the Sabers [sic], with the cutlery-based imagery intended as a reference to the city’s history as a steel town, and also gave them similar color schemes:

I also included some team identities that simply appealed to my own sense of whimsy. I of course had to include a team from my hometown of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, which I named after my best friend’s dog:

As for the tools of my trade, I meticulously created each drawing with my trusty yellow Pentel Sharplet-2, then colored them with Crayola markers, which were surprisingly durable and versatile. Ruled notebook paper was my go-to because it was easier to acquire than higher-quality paper (especially on my allowance).

All the logos were products of my own imagination and drawn freehand. I didn’t use much in the way of models or visual reference. Even with the more detailed logos, like the San Francisco Streetcars’ trolley or the Richmond Seafarers’ frigate, I had enough of an idea in my head of what I wanted them to look like that I was able to draw them from memory.

I created all of the baseball uniforms more or less on the first take. The beauty of working with pencil is I could erase and refine the drawings as I went along, so it wasn’t unusual for me to make tweaks before coloring in the finished design.

Most of the football uniforms were also done on the first take, although I mocked up a few ideas before creating the final versions. For the Sacramento Redwoods, for example, I experimented with layering red and brown markers to approximate a shade close to redwood bark for the team’s color scheme:

After spending months working on these drawings when I was 15 and 16, I eventually drifted away from the project as schoolwork and extracurricular activities took up more of my time. I shoved the drawings into the back of a folder with various other personal papers. There they stayed, largely untouched, for decades.

I never completely forgot about the drawings, but I lost track of where they were. They came to mind for the first time in ages earlier this spring, when I briefly referenced them in my entry for the “When I First Got ItT?” series, then again when I mentioned them in a phone conversation with Paul. I was pretty certain I still had them, but it took lots of time digging through boxes in my garage and several anxious moments fearing I might have inadvertently thrown them out before I finally stumbled on the right folder. Not to sound too cheesy, but finding them did feel something like reconnecting with a long-lost friend.

Now that I’ve rediscovered these uniform designs, I’m pleased with how well most of them have held up. A few pullovers and sansabelts notwithstanding, I can discern a preference for classicism that I still have today. You might say these drawings chronicle the development of a young sports fan who was just starting to Get It?.

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Paul here. I always love childhood projects like this one — big thanks to Kary for sharing it with us. If you want to see all of his uniform drawings, check out the slideshows below (or, if you prefer, here are the baseball and football designs):

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Culinary Corner: I suddenly realized the other day that crawfish season had come and almost gone already (one of several ways that the pandemic has messed with my sense of time). I’m still not willing to ride the subway, so yesterday morning I strapped on my Uni Watch mask (more on that in a minute), biked over to Manhattan — my first time crossing the river since my barbecue field trip back in April — and visited my favorite Chinatown fishmonger, where I was happy to find, as you can see in the video above, that they still had some crawfish available. The standard equation is three pounds per person, so I bought six pounds.

As I biked back home over the Manhattan Bridge, I wondered how many of the other cyclists I saw were toting live crawfish. I mean, probably zero, right? Then again, nobody would have thought that I was toting crawfish, so who knows!

When it was time to cook them, we made up our own spice boil by using some Old Bay, paprika, cayenne, dill weed, and whatever else looked good in the spice cupboard. Then we added some red potatoes, corn, and kielbasa — and then, finally, the bugs. What a feast! Turned out great (click to enlarge):

Soooooo good! Man, I fucking love crawfish. And we had enough left over to make some étoufée for tonight — can’t wait!

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3 DAYS LEFT: In case you missed it last week, my latest Uni Watch design contest for InsideHook is to create a logo for teams or leagues to wear in acknowledgment of the current racial justice protests.

We’re probably going to see a lot of these logos/patches/etc. when American sports leagues resume (well, if they resume). What should they look like?

Full details over at InsideHook.

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Mask update: Yesterday morning I made the long-awaited Uni Watch face masks available, with all Uni Watch profits being donated to Doctors Without Borders — and all 85 masks sold out in about 40 minutes. Holy shit — I figured they’d go pretty quickly, but not that quickly! I actually felt bad for our West Coast readers, who were still asleep by the time the last mask was sold.

These masks were donated to me by Dan Mullins of ProLook Sports. So I contacted him yesterday to see if I could order 300 more. Of course, I didn’t expect him to do another donation, so I asked him to give me a quote. But in an incredible act of generosity, he said he’d do another 300 for free — how amazing is that?!

I’m not sure how long that will take. But as soon as they’re ready, I’ll let you know. And once again, all Uni Watch profits will be donated to Doctors Without Borders. Thanks for making this such a successful project!

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Membership update: Fun fact: From 1977 through 1988, the Blue Jays’ road jerseys did not have NOBs — except in 1980, when they did have them! Reader Gavin Whitehead chose that 1980 design as the motif for his new membership card, which is part of a new batch that’s been added to the card gallery.

Ordering a membership card is a good way to support Uni Watch (which, frankly, could use your support these days). And remember, as a gesture of comm-uni-ty solidarity, the price of a membership has been reduced from $25 to $20 until further notice.

As always, you can sign up for your own custom-designed card here, you can see all the cards we’ve designed so far here (now more than 2,800 of them!), and you can see how we produce the cards here.

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The Ticker
By Lloyd Alaban

Baseball News: Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, wore a Nationals-themed face mask yesterday (from our own Anthony Emerson). … Umpire Dan Bellino wore a cap with a very off-center MLB logo in this photo (from 最新偷拍). … Even the Nationals’ dentist received a championship ring for last year’s World Series title. Instead of a player name, the dentist’s ring has “MED” (from?Griffin Smith). … Reader Jon Springer, like many other New Yorkers, voted in the state’s primary yesterday. Jon’s polling place was Frank Sinatra High School in Queens, where the school has a Sinatra-themed Mets jersey in one of their trophy cases. … Reader Michael Cooperman came across these sports-themed cigar box guitars. There’s a David Ortiz “Big Papi” guitar, a Dodgers guitar, and, for basketball fans, a Karl Malone guitar.

Football News: Bucs QB Tom Brady, who has an endorsement deal with Under Armour, posted a photo on Instagram where he obscured the Nike logo on his practice jersey (from?Rick Friedland). … The Rose Bowl will be used as a drive-in movie theater starting in July (from?Kary Klismet). … @TheLegalV found this 1990s NFL Christmas-themed blanket.

Hockey News: New logo for the Greater Ontario Junior Hockey League (from Wade Heidt). … New pads for Sabres G Linus Ullmark (from?Drew, who didn’t give his last name). … The Blues are practicing with a goalie “shooter tutor” wearing a Blackhawks logo (from?Mike Chamernik).

Basketball News: Here’s an article about Barkley Hendricks, a digital artist who has had a role in designing keys for various courts (from Adam Herbst). … Cross-listed from the baseball section: Reader Michael Cooperman came across these sports-themed cigar box guitars, including one with a Karl Malone design. There are also designs for former MLB star David Ortiz and the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Soccer News: New shirt for French side Lens (from Ed Zelaski). … Also from Ed: New home, second, and third shirts for Belgian side Genk.?… Manchester United celebrated MF Scott McTominay signing a five-year contract extension by giving him a shirt with No. “2025”, the year the contract will expire (from our own Anthony Emerson).

Grab Bag: Lots of new sports branding for UNC Charlotte (from multiple readers). … D’Youville College is changing its athletic nickname from the Spartans to the Saints. The school’s new mascot and visuals will be released at the end of the month (from Jeffrey Link).?… The U.S. Air Force has put in orders for maternity flight suits (from?James Gilbert). … The FBI determined that the noose found in NASCAR driver Bubba Wallace’s garage stall had actually been there since October and that Wallace was therefore not the victim of a hate crime. … A Black high school cross country runner in Texas whose school is partially named for Confederate general Robert E. Lee wrote a letter to the local school board explaining why she will no longer wear the school’s name on her uniform. Three of her teammates also plan to boycott the school’s name (from Jason Hillyer).

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What Paul did last night: One thing about making crawfish is that you need to boil a really big pot of water. And a really big pot of water takes a while to come to a boil. So last night we put the pot on the stove, added the spices, turned the heat up to high, and then went out onto the porch. A little over half an hour later, we could smell the spices wafting out from the kitchen, which meant it was time to go back in and start putting things in the pot.

The branch is still there.

As always, you can see the full set of Pandemic Porch Cocktails? photos here.

Sweet Relief: MLB Uni Ads Won’t Be Happening for Now

Good morning! I’m feeling very chipper today — and you should be as well! — because MLB uniform ads, which seemed like a done deal as recently as a few days ago, will not be happening after all, at least not right away.

Here’s the deal: As you’ve probably heard by now, the owners, having failed to reach a 2020 labor agreement with the players’ union, voted last night to to proceed with a 60-game season. Based on terms that were already agreed to back in March, the union does not need to approve this schedule — the owners can simply impose it, and that’s what they’ve done.

From a Uni Watch standpoint, here’s the big thing: The move toward uniform ads, which a few days ago seemed like foregone conclusion — not just for 2020 but for 2021 as well — is now dead. That’s because the addition of uni ads had been part of the 2020 negotiations and required both sides to buy in. With the negotiations collapsing and the owners imposing their own schedule, uni ads are no longer on the table.

Or at least that was my initial impression — none of last night’s initial reports about the new state of affairs mentioned the uni ads, but I was pretty sure that the owners couldn’t impose the ad patches unilaterally (uni-laterally?). As the news was breaking, I checked in with national MLB writers Jeff Passan of ESPN and Ken Davidoff of The New York Post, both of whom confirmed my understanding. So uni ads are now dead for 2020 and ’21 (although they’ll likely be part of the negotiations for the new collective bargaining agreement in 2022).

In other words, labor harmony’s loss is the uni-verse’s gain, at least for now.

As for the truncated season, the idea is that the players will report to “spring” training 2.0 on July 1 and the season will commence about three weeks after that, although it remains to be seen whether any of that will actually happen. Among the obstacles:

??The union retains the option to file a grievance against the owners — which many observers expect them to do — for bargaining in bad faith. That in turn could prompt the owners to file a counter-grievance accusing the union of bargaining in bad faith. It’s not clear, at least to me, how quickly those legal machinations would unfold or to what extent they could delay things.

??Reports indicate that a significant number of players may choose simply to sit out the season due to their disgust over the labor negotiations and/or their concerns over the virus.

??By far the biggest issue: Given the degree to which the virus is spiking in various areas of the country, the season may end up being shut down before it starts. Or, if they manage to start, it may be shut down before its scheduled end.

(As for other issues that had been subject to negotiation: Expanded playoffs are likewise off the table, meaning the postseason will continue to feature 10 teams, not 16. The DH, however, may still be added to the National League this year, as part of the new set of health and safety protocols. The union is expected to approve those protocols today.)

I remain somewhat skeptical that the season will actually begin, and even more skeptical that it will run its full length. Either way, though, we should all be happy that uniform ads have been pushed back at least two seasons. 2020 has been such an utter shit-show on so many levels, so let’s take some joy where we can find it. #NoUniAds

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Mmmm, tasty: Reader Harry Akers’s oldest daughter made him an ice cream cake for Pa’s Day and added some uni-centric decorations. How cool is that?!

“She made tequila sunrise ice cream and customized each macaroon,” says Harry. “These included the the Tigers’ old English D, my favorite number (21), and a couple Uni Watch references. Hope you enjoy the photo as much as I enjoyed the cake.”

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ITEM! Uni Watch masks now available: Sorry it took so long, but the Uni Watch face masks are now available.

I have only 85 of these, and they’re priced to move at $6 apiece, so they’ll probably sell out in a day or two. Teespring will take $2 from each sale as a processing fee; the remaining $4 from each sale will go directly to Doctors Without Borders. Uni Watch is not taking any profit.

I’ve been wearing one of these masks for my daily bike rides, and it’s great. Grab one while you can! Update: Holy shit — they sold out in about 40 minutes!

I’ll see about getting some more made.

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Collector’s Corner
By Brinke Guthrie
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Look at the colorful cover art on this 7″ record called Baseball, the First 100 Years. “Equal in quality and playing time to a 12″ LP”! The color is a bonus — the seller says most of these were printed up in black-and-white, too.?

Recorded in “Fleetwood Microsonic Sound,” it was narrated by none other than James (Jimmy) Stewart and Curt Gowdy! Now there’s a double-play combo, eh?

Now for the rest of this week’s picks:

? Going back a decade earlier for another baseball album, Dodgers ’59, with Vin Scully himself behind the mic for the narration!

? Jaws was released in the summer of 1975, and so the ABA Kentucky Colonels decided to knock off the movie poster premise for their 1975-76 media guide. Rather cheesy, I’d say. “Exclusive showings in Louisville and Cincinnati” is rather clever, though, as they played a few games at the new Cincinnati Riverfront Coliseum.

? The Mets logo is part of the camera lens on this 1977 team photo album.

? Love the font on this 1973 Eagles media guide, so typical of the period. The design is classic early-’70s, too, with that multi-colored montage effect, featuring, from left, Bill Bradley, head coach Mike McCormick, and Roman Gabriel.

? Look how simple this “Television” press pass was for a 1970s Pats/Dolphins game. Just a plain slip of paper, head on in at Gate No. 10! Seems like it would be easy to counterfeit, no?

? Speaking of press passes, check out this 1977 button for CBS Sports. You get three buttons in this set, and they each boldly state “Admit Bearer to Any Area.” If security tries to stop you, just act cool and point at this pin — you’re in like Flynn!

? Here’s a New York Yankees promo notepad/pen giveaway, sponsored by Bell Atlantic Mobile. The seller says late 1990s for this one.

? Look at the simple single-bar facemask on this Baltimore Colts Tenth Anniversary Year Book. Judging by the dates, looks like it was actually the 10th season, not the 10th anniversary. The seller will also toss in a pair of media guides from 1970 and ’71.

? This 1940s Montreal Canadiens patch is clean, simple, and neat.

? Love this repro of a mid-century poster featuring cartoon depictions of various hockey penalties, sponsored by your friends at Old Mr. Boston liquors.

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Contest reminder: In case you missed it last week, my latest Uni Watch design contest for InsideHook is to create a logo for teams or leagues to wear in acknowledgment of the current racial justice protests.

We’re probably going to see a lot of these logos/patches/etc. when American sports leagues resume (well, if they resume). What should they look like?

Full details over at InsideHook.

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Membership update: Few things make me happier than when we get an membership order for a Miami Floridans-themed card, as was the case with the order we recently received from reader Eric Maddy. That is one sharp-looking card!

Eric’s design is one of several that have been added to the membership card gallery. I expect the laminated/printed versions of these cards to mail out around the end of the week.

Ordering a membership card is a good way to support Uni Watch (which, frankly, could use your support these days). And remember, as a gesture of comm-uni-ty solidarity, the price of a membership has been reduced from $25 to $20 until further notice.

As always, you can sign up for your own custom-designed card here, you can see all the cards we’ve designed so far here (now more than 2,800 of them!), and you can see how we produce the cards here.

Speaking of memberships, our latest raffle winners are Matthew Garry Moon and Aeneas Koosis, each of whom has won himself a free membership card. Congrats to them, and thanks to David Dahl for sponsoring this one.

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The Ticker
By Paul

’Skins Watch: An Oklahoma City Thunder blog has come up with a Thunder-redesign concept to honor Oklahoma’s Native American heritage (from Kary Klismet). … With lots of statues and monuments being torn down around the country, a Washington Post sportswriter says the ’Skins name is the NFL’s “most shameful statue” and that it’s time to take it down (from Rob Bindeman). … The teams at Teton High School in Idaho, whose teams had been called the Redskins, will now be called the Timberwolves (from Timmy Donahue). … There’s renewed pressure to change the “Indians” team name at Mahopac High School in New York’s Hudson Valley, “where until recently it was not uncommon to see students in Native American headdress carrying out a mock scalping” (from Steven Dodell). … Michigan high schools’ days of using Native American imagery may be numbered (from Kary Klismet).

Working Class Wannabes?: An incoming freshman on the Fort Hays State University women’s soccer team is described as having a “blue collar, hardworking mentality.” … A high school baseball coach in Vero Beach, Fla., describes one of his pitchers as “a humble kid, a blue-collar type of guy.” … An article about Washington NFL LB Matthew Ioannidis describes him as having a “hard-nosed, blue-collar mentality.” … An article about Big 12 football players describes Kansas State C Cody Whitehair as “one of the toughest and most blue-collar players to come out of Kansas State in recent years.” Not just blue-collar, mind you, but one of the most blue-collar! … An article about the NBA’s Detroit Pistons says that, in the past, the team has “defined blue-collar basketball.” … An article about college basketball says the 2017-18 WVU team was “full of blue-collar seniors from the mountains of West Virginia.” … Speaking of WVU, an article about their head football coach, Neal Brown, quotes an opposing coach who describes the WVU defense like so: “They want to be blue collar, they want to be disciplined.” What the hell does it mean to want to be blue collar? … An article about the 1996-97 Illinois-Wesleyan basketball team says the roster featured “a slew of blue-collar contributors.” … An article about L.A. Rams DT Aaron Donald says his “blue-collar work ethic inspires everyone from all walks of life.” … Northwestern State University basketball coach Mike McConathy is a fan of his newly promoted assistant coach, Jeff Moore, because “Every day, he comes to work with a blue-collar mentality.” … The newly hired basketball coach at Tyler Leo High School in Texas says, “We want to constantly put pressure on our opponents and play with a blue-collar mentality.” … An article about the NHL says the early Flyers squads “quickly built a reputation for their gritty, blue-collar style of play.” … Yet another article about the Flyers says that “there’s no team that so completely reflects its city the way the Flyers do. Philadelphia is a blue-collar, hard-working city with a flair for excitement.” … Former Cleveland Browns RB Josh Cribbs says, “We’re just a hard-working football town, blue-collar to the core.” … The Duke baseball team’s Twitter account has routinely used the hashtag #BlueCollar. … An article about a high school basketball player in Nebraska says, “He came to work every day, punched the time clock and went about getting the job done.” Interestingly, the article’s headline includes the term “Blue Collar” in quotes, even though that term doesn’t appear in the article. … An article about a former high school football player in Massachusetts says, “He was a blue-collar lineman.” The player in question went on to become a journalist — a white collar profession. … An article about former MLB player and current Blue Jays broadcaster Kevin Barker says he “never mailed it in, always ran out groundballs and had a blue-collar work ethic.” … The coach of a girls’ high school basketball team in Alabama says, “We like to think of our program as blue collar.” … Oregon State basketball coach Wayne Tinkle says his father taught him, “If you want something, you have to work for it. That blue collar, hard hat, lunch pail mentality.” Bingo!

Baseball News: Good article on how the Red Sox organist has been live-streaming organ concerts (NYT link) each afternoon. … Here’s why former Braves skipper Bobby Cox wore spikes while managing (from Kary Klismet). … Holy moly, look at this 1970s shot of Phillies ushers and related staff.

Pro Football News: The 49ers added a Black Lives Matter flag to their stadium (thanks, Brinke). … A Rhode Island brewery has trolled former Pats players Tom Brady and Rob Gronkowski by producing a run of “Traitorade” beer (from @Beerbythepool). … Reader Casey Hawes has created a Ravens-resdesign concept. … Here’s one blogger’s take on the greatest Saskatchewan Roughriders to wear Nos. 70-79 through the years (from Wade Heidt).

College Football News: Ole Miss will retire Eli Manning’s No. 10 at some point this fall (thanks to all who shared).
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Hockey News: The first renderings of the Islanders’ new arena have been released (from Wade Heidt). … Here’s how you can build a coat hanger from a few hockey sticks (from Mike Chamernik).
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NBA/WNBA News: Clippers G Lou Williams would like to see “Black Lives Matter” on NBA jerseys and courts. … The Timberwolves’ deal with their original uniform sponsor advertiser, Fitbit, has expired, so the team is now looking for a new advertiser that will promote social awareness and fight racism and inequality (thanks, Phil). … The WNBA’s Angel McCoughtry wants the league to allow players to wear NOBs featuring the names of police brutality victims (from @TheSkyShowCHI). … The Spurs are encouraging fans to create their own Spurs court designs (from Mike Chamernik). … The New York Daily News is encouraging the Nets to wear several throwback designs from their New Jersey days (from @carter8_kid).

Soccer News: Our own Jamie Rathjen notes that yesterday was the anniversary of the Argentina/England quarterfinal at the 1986 World Cup, when Diego Maradona scored two goals known as “the hand of God” and the “goal of the century.” “The shirts Argentina wore for that game were royal blue, the same color as the ones from the game before that,” says Jamie, “but they actually were a one-off design different from, and lighter than, the earlier design. Judging by the quotations from Maradona’s book, in this article, he Gets It?.” … The Polish national team had its players pose in a super-cool series of throwback uniforms (from @MrBudziszewski). … New shirts for Belgian side Club Brugge and new kits for Scottish side Ross County (both from Ed Zelaski). … Here’s an early look at Austin FC’s new stadium. Meanwhile, construction of their new training facility has started (both from Wade Heidt). … Japan has taken itself out of the running to host the 2023 Women’s World Cup, leaving Australia/New Zealand as the clear favorites. … EPL club Burnley has condemned a plane that flew yesterday’s game against Manchester City towing a “White Lives Matter” banner. … “The end of the season was canceled in England’s League One and League Two, but they’re still holding the promotion playoffs,” says our own Jamie Rathjen. “Teams have been wearing a different NHS patch than the one worn in the Premier League, and Exeter City positioned it above the maker’s mark.”

Grab Bag: MLL unveiled a new set of uniforms yesterday. Additional info here. … The 11-year-old kid who lives across the street from me was wearing this “Earthling” T-shirt the other day. I was struck by how the design looked like NOB lettering. … A mannequin wearing a pig mask and a police uniform was found hanging from a highway overpass in Florida over the weekend. … Colgate’s Chinese toothpaste, Darlie, is the latest brand that may get get a makeover due to racially insensitive imagery. In addition, the name of Eskimo Pie ice cream treats will be changed. Here’s a roundup of all the brands that have recently been changed or are under review. … Slight logo tweaks for the University of Saskatchewan (from Trevor “Teebz” Alexander). … Here’s a good summary of arguments for and against UNLV keeping its “Rebels” team name (from Kary Klismet). … Yesterday’s Uni Watch entry about team colors in various cities inspired reader William Yurasko to look at that phenomenon from a DC-centric perspective. Among other things, he notes that DC teams use seven different shades of red!

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What Paul did last night: The house just north of ours has been vacant for months — the owners decamped for parts unknown when the pandemic hit. But yesterday, as we were sitting on the porch, they drove into their driveway — first time we’d seen them since March. Turns out they’d been laying low upstate and were now returning for a few days just to check in on their house.

These neighbors have never been particularly warm or friendly toward us, and I can’t say we’re in love with them either. But it was nice to see them back on the block — a little sign of normalcy.

The branch is still there.

As always, you can see the full set of Pandemic Porch Cocktails? photos here.

Which City’s Teams Are the Most Color-Consistent?

[Editor’s Note: Good morning! Today we have a guest entry from Mat Swatek, who’s created a project regarding team colors that I’m pretty sure everyone here will love. Enjoy! — PL]

By Mat Swatek

Have you ever thought about how teams in a particular city tend to use similar colors for their uniforms and logos? This is something I’ve thought about a lot, and some random conversations with friends over the years finally led me to do an actual analysis of team colors within North American cities.

Before getting to the results, I need to briefly discuss the ground rules I set up and the methodology I used.

The Ground Rules

1. The teams in each city have to play within a reasonable commute from the center of that city, although I made a few exceptions. I grouped the Packers under Milwaukee, since I found it to be a reasonable commute to attend Packers games every other weekend. The Bay Area is another oddity, as Oakland, San Francisco, and San Jose are in close proximity and have a bunch of teams between them. I decided not to group all of these teams because ultimately they identify with different cities. New York, on the other hand, has multiple teams in New Jersey but are grouped together because almost every team shares “New York” in its name.

2. To qualify for this analysis, a city had to have at least two teams. This is obviously a small sample size for comparing colors, but I wanted to include as many cities in this analysis as possible to get a true sense of the color-matching landscape. It also didn’t feel right to exclude smaller sports hubs such as Buffalo, New Orleans, and St. Louis.

3. To compare team colors within cities, I focused on the primary and secondary colors for each team. When those colors were not immediately obvious, I looked first to the team’s uniforms and then to the logo. I also generally avoided any consideration of white or grey, since those colors are present on many uniforms. But again, I made some exceptions to that rule, since some teams are primarily identified with those colors (e.g., the Raiders, Spurs, Yankees, Red Wings, etc.).

4. I aligned team colors within each city by primary and secondary colors. I did a bit of rearranging in some places to maximize the similarity. For example, the Bulls’ primary color is red, but that’s the secondary color for most Chicago teams, so I flipped black and red.

The Methodology

This gets a little wonky: The first step in making the color comparisons was collecting the RGB color mix for each team. The RGB values represent the full spectrum of colors using a combination of levels of red, green, and blue light (each scaled from 0 to 255). Once I gathered all the color data, I converted it to a slightly more accurate model that uses the CIELAB format, which uses color coordinates denoted by the letters L, a, and b. I used a simple distance formula to determine the difference in each team’s colors within each city. To do that, I took the difference in primary colors among all pairs of teams within a city. Then, I did the same for the secondary colors. In the formula below, I’m determining the difference in the primary colors of team1 and team2 [click to enlarge]:

This left me with differences in primary colors among all sets of teams within the city (e.g., the difference between the Cubs’ blue and the Bears’ blue, as well as the difference between the Bulls’ black and the Bears’ blue). The primary color score is the median of the differences of the primary colors. I did the same for the differences among secondary colors. Averaging these two scores gave me the overall two-color score, which identified which cities are the most color-cohesive and which have the most differences among their teams.

Version 1 Feedback and Changes Made

I tweeted an earlier version of this analysis in mid-May and I received a ton of feedback. It turns out that people know a lot more about their teams than I do! It was fun learning about the color history of some teams and how well-liked certain uniforms and color combos are. I corrected the errors that people pointed out and also added in WNBA and NWSL teams where applicable, which several people suggested. In almost every case, adding those teams increased the color similarity within cities.

Results

So now you’ve made it (or just skipped ahead) to the part you care about: Which city is the most color-cohesive? The answer, of course, is Pittsburgh. The primary yellow colors are beaten in similarity only by the blues in Indianapolis; the secondary black hues trail only the blues in St. Louis and the blacks in San Jose. The picture below shows the team logos as well as their primary, secondary, and tertiary colors. (The primary and secondary colors are used in the overall scoring, and I added the tertiary color just for fun.)

The No. 2 and No. 3 cities in terms of color similarity are Atlanta (with five teams) and New Orleans (two teams):

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We can just as easily flip things around and look at which cities are the most color-dissimilar across teams. Kansas City has one of the most dissimilar primary color scores, mainly thanks to the red of the Chiefs. KC teams’ secondary colors also clash, ranking in the bottom 10 among all cities. Add these two scores together and you have your least color-cohesive city!

Other cities whose teams have clashing colors are Columbus, San Francisco, Baltimore, and Minneapolis.

To get a snapshot of where each city falls in terms of its two-color score, you can refer to the map below. The size of the dots represent the number of teams in that city while the color represents the overall two-color score. Lighter colors represent cities that are more color-cohesive, like Pittsburgh, while darker colors denote cities that are less so, such as Kansas City:

You can see an interactive version of that map, and a whole lot more, on this page, which has the full results of my analysis.

I plan on adding another section for ad-hoc requests. Though I’m no expert on sports fandom in New York, I think its 13 teams could probably be split up several different ways based on natural subsets of fandom or geography. I also mentioned earlier that the Bay Area gave me some trouble, and I am considering grouping all teams in that region and seeing how well they align. If you have a region that you’d like to see expanded or sub-divided, or have any other interesting ideas (e.g., adding college teams to the mix or looking at teams that moved cities or changed colors), then feel free to email me at mbswatek@gmail.com with your suggestions. Thanks!

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Paul here. What a great project! I definitely recommend spending some time poking around on Mat’s site — lots of food for thought from this project. Thanks for sharing it with Uni Watch, Mat!

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Flames follow-up: Remember my recent interview with Bill Brownridge, who designed the Calgary Flames’ “diagonal” uniforms? Reader Dave Turigan found an article about that uni set, including lots of quotes from Bill, in a 1995 Flames program. Good stuff!

The first page of the article is shown above. You can see the rest of the pages here.

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Contest reminder: In case you missed it last week, my latest Uni Watch design contest for InsideHook is to create a logo for teams or leagues to wear in acknowledgment of the current racial justice protests.

We’re probably going to see a lot of these logos/patches/etc. when American sports leagues resume (well, if they resume). What should they look like?

Full details over at InsideHook.

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ITEM! Another membership raffle: Reader David Dahl recently purchased two memberships for me to give away, so that’s what we’re going to do today.

This will be a one-day raffle. No entry restrictions for this one — open to all. To enter, send an email to the raffle address by 8pm Eastern tonight. I’ll announce the two winners tomorrow.

As you know, we’ve had a slew of these donated memberships lately, but this is the last one, at least for now. If you’d like to help support Uni Watch by purchasing a membership for me to raffle off (or by just ordering a membership card for yourself), you can do that here.

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The Ticker
By Jamie Rathjen

Baseball News: We’ve featured Paper Stadiums projects several times recently, and it’s now added Shea Stadium to its list (from Mike Chamernik).
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NFL News: Reader Kurt Rozek asked former Bengals QB Kenny Anderson why he often seemed to have a grey facemask with chipped black paint, rather than just a true black mask, and got a great response from Anderson. … In case you missed it, Washington is retiring No. 49 for RB Bobby Mitchell, the team’s first Black player, and also named the lower level of their stadium after him. That level of the stadium had been named for the team’s racist founder, George Preston Marshall, whose statue outside the team’s former home, RFK Stadium, was removed on Friday.

College Football News: Georgia Tech’s uniform for the 2009 Orange Bowl was an exercise in one-time use: It was never worn again and also featured the Buzz yellow jacket logo together with the helmet logo on the pants, which apparently has also never happened before or since (from Michael Rich).

Hockey News: A Golden Knights website mentioned the team potentially getting a fourth jersey, but it’s not clear if it would be used for warm-ups or games (from Thomas Roddy). … You may have heard that the Sabres fired more than 20 people last week. They have more problems, because they didn’t flood their practice facility properly when they shut it down in March, so the rink’s boards warped and have to be replaced (from Wade Heidt). … Here’s then-Flames C Joe Nieuwendyk wearing an odd facemask in 1992 or 1993, which looks like the full-face masks sometimes seen now in the NHL but not made out of plastic (from Johnny Garfield).

Soccer News: New kits for English League One’s Crewe Alexandra, the German Bundesliga’s RB Leipzig, and the 2. Bundesliga’s Darmstadt 98 (all from Ed ?elaski). … Another from Ed: The Polish third tier’s Widzew ?ód? wore their white second kit at home. … France’s Ligue 1 and Ligue 2 have new logos and number/NOB fonts. … German women’s team USV Jena, just relegated from the Frauen-Bundesliga, are to become the women’s team for the local men’s 3. Liga team, Carl Zeiss Jena (from my brother Nate Rathjen). … In Spain, Celta de Vigo’s normal beer advertiser replaced its ad with a charity supporting the hospitality sector. It looks like Deportivo de La Coru?a, Real Valladolid, and the Segunda División’s CD Lugo might participate as well (from Germán Cabrejo). … English Championship team Swansea City’s striker Rhian Brewster celebrated a goal on Saturday by holding up a shirt saying “Our colour is not a crime,” while in the same league Wigan Athletic wore Black Lives Matter warm-up shirts. … Liverpool striker Divock Origi’s National Health Service patch still had the paper attached to it yesterday (from multiple readers). … In the NWSL, Washington Spirit players and coaches knelt during training on Friday. … Portland Timbers players formed “BLM” during training on Saturday (thanks, Anthony). … Another from Anthony that we’ve Ticked half of before: in 2006, the players wearing No. 8 for Liverpool and Everton at the time, Steven Gerrard and James Beattie, wore No. 08 because Liverpool had been chosen as one of the EU’s European Capitals of Culture for 2008. … Among the banners Premier League teams are using to cover their seats is a rainbow one from Norwich City in memory of former striker Justin Fashanu, who in 1990 became the first player in the sport to come out as gay.

Grab Bag: NASCAR Cup driver Denny Hamlin planned to run a National Civil Rights Museum-themed car for yesterday’s race at Talladega Superspeedway in Alabama. The event was postponed to today due to rain, and Hamlin’s car will carry added weight given that a noose was discovered in driver Bubba Wallace’s garage stall yesterday. Wallace is the Black driver who successfully urged NASCAR to ban the Confederate battle flag at its events (from @texastrevor). … France will allow 5,000 spectators inside stadiums for events starting July 11, while in Australia Queensland is to allow stadiums to fill to a quarter of capacity, up to a maximum of 10,000. … Rider University has a new surface for its soccer and field hockey teams. … Two more schools will no longer call their teams the Rebels: Fairfax High in Virginia and Quartz Hill High in California (the latter item from Erik Bogh). … Minnesota State Patrol officers have been wearing maroon and gold uniforms since 1934, when the change was made to honor one of Minnesota’s football national championships (from Kary Klismet).

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What Paul did last night: Around the corner from us is a street with a grassy median, which is technically part of the NYC parks system and thus open to anyone who wants to hang out on it. Nobody ever did that, at least not that I was aware of, until the pandemic hit, when people got sick of being cooped up inside and started using the median for picnics, yoga, sunbathing, or whatever. The median is nicely tree-shaded and traffic is light because the street is a dead end, so the median has become a convenient option for us when we want to have socially distant meet-ups with friends.

That’s what we did yesterday afternoon with our buddy Sujan, who lives a few neighborhoods away. She biked over to our place and then we all walked around the corner, pitched blankets a safe distance apart, and had a nice visit (click to enlarge):

Later on, Mary and I convened on the porch, talked a bit about our fathers (cuz it was Pa’s Day and all), and thought about how the days will now be getting shorter. Happy post-Summer Solstice!

The branch is still there.

As always, you can see the full set of Pandemic Porch Cocktails? photos here.

For Our Dads: Happy Father's Day 2020 From Uni Watch

By Phil Hecken

For the past seven years (2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018 and 2019) it has been my privilege and pleasure to run photographs of our fathers dressed in uniforms — whether they be sports uniforms, military uniforms, or any other uniform. The response was overwhelmingly positive, and I’m pleased to again run this feature. This year I let readers know they could submit photos of their dads, grandpappys and uncles.

If you’re not familiar with this tradition, just click on any of the past Father’s Day posts for a description. That’s all I’ll have to say today. So sit back, enjoy (and click on the photos to enlarge). I’m running them in the order they were received. I did receive two “late” entries (they came in on Friday, and one on Saturday, even though the deadline was Thursday at midnight, but I’m including them as well — I don’t want to keep anyone from their tributes!), so the verbiage in the writeup will reflect that.

Happy Father’s Day everyone!

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Jimmy Corcoran

I still can’t believe my father was able to get his Bell uniform out of the locker room for this photo shoot? It was always a goal of his to be on a magazine cover. It finally happened for him in 1974 for a local Philadelphia magazine called Metropolitan. They wanted him in his road blue jersey because they thought the white jersey would look too dull. The only problem was Bob Colonna the equipment manager wouldn’t let him have the jersey, he was afraid it would get lost and he didn’t have a spare. My father promised to bring it back but Bob wanted him to give him his Pottstown Firebirds Championship ring for collateral, my father said he would be glad to do it but the ring got stolen when our house was robbed in 1973.

My father said to him, “what do you think the King is going to do with it, walk around the streets of Philly in my game jersey?” Finally Bob let him have the uniform. Once in a while despite being ultra cocky my father would let down his guard and tell me the truth. When I told him how great it was that he got the cover he said “I have to be honest with you Jimbo, the only reason the King got this gig was because they couldn’t get Roman Gabriel for it”. Happy Father’s Day to all the Uni Watch Dad’s and to the ones that are no longer with us, we miss you and think about you today.

Jimmy Corcoran

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Mike Colvin

Phil,

I’ve combined photos of my grandfather Thomas Colvin and father Frank Colvin in their respective uniforms while serving in World War II and Vietnam. My Grandfather served in Dutch Guiana in The Pacific Theater and his tank has my grandmother’s name, “Annie” written on the side. This is the first Father’s Day since my dad passed last August and it means a lot to honor him here.

Thanks!

Mike Colvin

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Doug Simpson

This picture is of my dad Darrell Simpson. He was raised in Estill Springs,TN which is a few miles from Winchester. This was in 1958 when he was 10. He played for Dechard Franklin which was a textile mill from what I understand. Excellent ball player who wasn’t allowed to play on the same team as his older brother since they were so good. They were placed on 2 different teams!

Doug Simpson

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Christy Cater Simpson

This is my dad David Cater. He served 3 tours in Vietnam. He lost his leg in his last tour. He received 3 Purple Hearts and a Silver Star and a Bronze Star. He passed away in September 2017.

Christy Cater Simpson

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Ed Kozak

My father, Edward Kozak, was an artilleryman in World War II, serving in the European Theatre with the 44th Division. He always said he was fortunate, because the Allies were always shooting at the Germans, but the enemy, being in retreat, rarely shot back at him. Luckily the atomic bombs were dropped on Japan; otherwise he would have been shipped out to the Pacific to fight Japan like so many others. Fortunately he was soon mustered out and started a family with his bride, my mom, instead. Here’s his Army photo.

Thank you,
Ed Kozak, Bolingbrook, IL

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Bud Brooks

This is my father, Francis A. (Bud) Brooks Jr., from Braintree, Massachusetts, in 1949, kneeling down on the far left. During the summer of 1949, he played baseball for the Blacks Harbour Brunswicks team in Blacks Harbour, New Brunswick. They won the league championship that summer. He turned 88 on June 11, has been married 61 years, and has two children and four grandchildren, all living in Dallas, TX.

Thank you,

Bud Brooks

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Jeff Pollock

Photo of my great-grandfather Charles Quick (front right) as goaltender for the 1918 Terra Novas. The trophy is the Boyle Trophy, the second oldest hockey trophy in North America (after the Stanley Cup). The trophy was donated in 1904 by Governor Sir Cavendish Boyle, and awarded as the National Championship of Newfoundland (Newfoundland was an independent country prior to joining Canada in 1949).

Jeff Pollock

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Craig Harris

On the front row, second from the right is my Dad, Dr. Michael S. Harris, in his 1951 Little League Uniform in Garland, Texas. My Dad has been a lifelong baseball fan and has passed that passion on to me. We have attended dozens of games together dating back to the early 1970s including seeing our hometown Texas Rangers clinch their first American League Championship against the Yankees at home in Arlington in 2010.

Craig Harris

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Derek Benner

My father Arnold Benner has always lived in Friendship, Maine and is a long time lobsterman there. The photo shows him in 1961in his Waldoboro High School baseball uniform. He was primarily a third baseman but pitched some. That year as a senior he had a game where he threw 4 no-hit innings and hit two home runs. Other uniforms he’s worn: National Guard sergeant and state champion candlepin bowler representing DePatsy’s Lanes.

Derek Benner

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Nate Williams

Hi Phil –

This is a picture of a baseball team comprised entirely of my grandfather (2nd row, far right) and his 8 other brothers. Their dad, my great-grandfather, is the coach. This was in Menomonie, Wisconsin, and they were known as “The Larson 9.” To the best of my knowledge, this photo was taken around 1930, when my grandfather would’ve been about 20 years old. It’s one of my favorite family pictures of my grandpa, I have copies of it in my home and office, and my sons (twins, who are now 19) have it in their dorm room, too.

Thanks for doing this!

Nate Williams

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Trey Volk

Hello, everyone!

This is my dad, Jeff Volk, dressed up in these beautiful orange threads (check out the socks and shoes!) in 1980. He was a PF for the Rugby Panthers (Rugby, ND). This is a figurine cutout they did for all the seniors. Pretty cool! Happy Father’s Day to all of the dads out there.

Trey Volk

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Howard Bosworth

Good Morning Phil

I just sent a photo of my maternal Grandfather.

I promised to send a few words along to accompany the photo.

My Grandfather, Charles Oswald worked a Branch Manager for Bankers Trust and traveled from branch to branch to oversee the operations.

He was a wonderful man, who taught me a lot about many things. I am forever grateful for his patience, wisdom and love he shared with us all.

Sincerely,
Howard Bosworth

[Yes, I know he’s technically not *in uniform* but how could I not run this??? — PH]

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Scott Crocker

My father, Sgt. Daniel J. Crocker, served in the United States Marine Corps from 1967-1970. He spent most of his civilian career working for the State of Michigan as the Director of Veterans Services for The Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW). Even though he retired several years ago, he continues to advocate for veterans any chance he gets. Here he is initiating a conversation with a fellow veteran at a Detroit Tigers spring training game in Lakeland, Florida last year. God has been gracious to bless me with such a wonderful dad.

Gratefully,

Scott Crocker

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Timothy Regan

My Dad, T J Regan (2nd row center) circa 1951 Varsity Spring Track at Phillips Academy-Andover. Remarkable because I never knew my father when he had hair and Andover Springs were always too cold for these tank tops. Two different logo treatments mystify me. Lost TJ 2 years ago.

Timothy Regan

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Dennis Jones

My Grandfather (Mother’s Father) John Calametti lived in Mobile, Alabama. He worked on the shipping docks and played baseball and basketball around Mobile. I believe this team photo is from mid-1920s.

Dennis Jones

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Jared Adkins

This is a photo of my dad when he was in the Falls Church (VA) high school band.

He was about 15 at the time, and was (and still is) a damn good tuba player.

I credit my love of music to him.

Happy Father’s Day dad!

Jared Adkins

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Christopher Hickey

My father, Dr. John S. Hickey, MD, served as team doctor for the Father Judge High School football team from 1955 til 1976 (the photo is from the early 1970’s, and one of the few I have of him acting in that capacity). This was before sports medicine was a popular specialty and athletic trainers were commonplace, so he relied solely on his skills as a general practitioner, his experiences as a former player, and the contents of his ‘house call’ bag to treat injured Crusaders or their opponents. While he didn’t wear a uniform in the performance of his duties (i.e.: pre-season no-cost physicals, game-day first aid, post-game office follow-up visits if needed), he selflessly volunteered his time and talents to a countless number who did.

Last February, my dad was posthumously inducted into the team’s Hall of Honor; he passed away in 1984. The ceremony included a heart-felt testimonial given by one of my brothers, along with a couple of amusing off-the-record stories shared by past players. As wonderful as it was to celebrate him that night, it was also the last time I have been able to gather with my family, including my mother…she resides in a senior living facility, due to coronavirus safety/distancing measures. I miss my dad each day, especially today, and hope to reunite with my mom and brothers and sisters for another happy occasion very soon.

Chris Hickey

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Brad Eenhuis

I’ve always admired the old yearbook photos when they posed. This is my Dad’s senior year of basketball. Our schools colors were green and white but I was always intrigued that these road uniforms were black(with green and white lettering). I ended up recreating the jersey so I had one to wear.

Brad Eenhuis

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Harrison Hamm

This is my dad, Jamie Hamm, playing football as a freshman at Wheeling Central Catholic High School in West Virginia. The uniform is all-maroon — note the unusual double-striped helmets and thick white pants stripe. He wore #9 as a freshman but would eventually wear his usual #19, chosen for Johnny Unitas, as an upperclassman.

Harrison Hamm

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Patrick Barnett

My dad, Robert Barnett, Jr, is second from the left in the front row. Here he is playing for the 1947 St. Columba basketball team in Louisville, putting him at about 11 or 12 years old at the time. Our family has several pictures of him in different sports uniforms, but most of those were, essentially, costume uniforms his parents bought for him. This may have been the only time in his life where he played for an organized sports team. He went on to become a pharmacist, husband, and father of twelve. He died in 2004.

Thanks!

Patrick Barnett

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Justin C. Cliburn

Hi, Phil:

Attached is a photo of my dad, Robert Cliburn, in the Army in 1973. He spent four years active-duty, two in the infantry and two on a Pershing nuclear missile site. He then spent several years in the Army Reserves later in life before having to retire due to a medical condition. Also attached is him 20 years later coaching elementary school baseball. My little brother is second from left. He took his life last October, and this will be my dad’s first Father’s Day without him. Maybe appearing on Uni Watch will help.

Thanks (and thanks for retweeting my extremely biased Saints poll on Twitter).

Justin Cliburn (@bootscallahan)

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Ed Kemp

Phil,

Great work with the site. Been a fan for many years.

Attached is a trading card the city of New Brunswick made for the Firefighters, including my Father (attached) and the write up.

Since you can’t see the back of the card, let me give you the “stats”:

Bob was hired by the City of New Brunswick in 1973 and worked his way up the ranks. By 1986 he was promoted to Captain and then again to Deputy Chief in 1993, the position he maintained until his retirement in 1999. In 1985 he received the FMBA Valor Award and in 1999 was named the Knights of Columbus Firefighter of the Year. Known for his cool, calm demeanor on the job, Bob was nicknamed “The Iceman” by fellow firefighters and the Home News Tribune.

Thanks!

Ed Kemp

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Tim Shriver

Hi Phil,

Dad recently scanned a bunch of old slides into digital format with a home-use device made for doing a lot of them quickly, so they don’t have a great professional feel, but here’s one that sticks out a bit as being fairly good looking. It’s from the 1970’s, early in his time playing on a men’s rec (beer) league team called the DePaul Alumni Soccer Club, initially for graduates of DePaul University but later opened to anyone who wanted to play. Dig the long sleeves paired with shorts, and the one knee sock versus one shorty. Hope dad’s shins were okay that day.

Happy Father’s Day,

Tim Shriver

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James Erdmann

Hi Phil. I know your post said to include just one photo, but I’ve included two photos (in 1 JPG, mind you)?. I understand if you need to crop it down to one picture, however. Here’s the story of the two pics:

The picture on top is of my grandfather, Carl Sr. sometime in the early sixties. He owned Erdmann Drug Store in Grafton, WI for 35 years. The bottom picture is his son (my dad), Carl Jr on the left with an unknown store employee, sometime in the late sixties. He also was a pharmacist for over 30 years at multiple stores in Indianapolis. They’re both gone now (2001 & 2009 respectively) and I definitely miss them. The pharmacy profession skipped a generation in my family, but is now back with my daughter as a sophomore pharmacy student at Butler University, my dad’s alma mater. Happy Father’s Day, and Go Dawgs!

James Erdmann

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Patrick DiRubbo

Dear Phil,

This is a photo of my father, Tony DiRubbo, in his high school football uniform. The photo is from 1940 or 1941 taken in front of his house. He attended Vocational High School in Syracuse, NY. My Dad died in 2013, but he shared the same birthday as Paul, March 21.

Rick DiRubbo

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Matthew Houk

Phil,

I hope this isn’t being sent too late and can still be included for Sunday.

This is my Grandfather, Gary Allan Houk. He served in the US Army from the early 60s to the mid-80s, rising to the rank of Chief Warrant Officer three. He passed away this past Saturday, June 13th. He gave my Dad his first baseball glove from Korea after a deployment there. That instilled in my Dad his own love of baseball which he passed on to my brother and I. We will miss him a ton. There’s so much more to tell but he was an amazing man and loving grandfather.

Sincerely,

Matthew Houk

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Caleb Bentz

My father (far right) and Dr. Martin Luther College teammates – October 1982 – New Ulm, MN.
I’m the bundle of blankets.

– Caleb Bentz

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Kary Klismet

Hi, Phil-

Here’s my photo to include with my tribute to my dad, and here’s the text of the tribute:

My dad, Peter M. Klismet, Jr., has worn numerous uniforms in his life, those of the U.S. Navy and the Ventura (Calif.) Police Department being two of the most significant. I’m proud of his service to our country and his community, but the uniform that speaks most to me was the one he wore to help coach my first Little League team. A timid, light-hitting eight-year-old, I might have quit without his reassuring presence. His influence guided me toward a love of sports that’s brought us many great memories and still bonds us today. Thanks for always being there for me, Dad!

?Thanks for putting this Father’s Day tribute together every year, Phil! It’s an invaluable service to the Uni Watch community!

Best,

-Kary

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Jen Hayden

Phil!

I am so sorry…..I wanted to send this yesterday, but it was my Mom’s birthday and I got distracted. Please don’t say it’s too late to include my Dad this year. We lost him in March and I was looking forward to this….

His name is Donald Hayden

Thanks.

– Jennifer Hayden

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Steve Ramsey

Hi Phil- I realize I missed the midnight deadline last night, but it took me awhile to remember where I’d put this photo. Blame it on the pandemic, I guess. I hope you’ll consider allowing these to be part of the Sunday photo posting. I’m really sorry these are late.

My father, Jack Ramsey, passed away from natural causes (not covid-19) earlier this year, February 6, 2020. He was 98 years old. He received a football scholarship to attend Marin College in San Rafael, CA. He injured his knee during training camp in 1940 and never played for the team.

(L-R: Jack Ramsey, North Central High School, Spokane WA. 1939; US Army Corporal Jack Ramsey, Day D plus 4, 1944; Jack Ramsey, February 2, 2014 celebrating the Seahawks Super Bowl win)

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Thanks, Phil. I”m a daily reader of the blog and a big fan of all Paul, you and the others do daily.

Take good care, and stay safe-
Steve Ramsey

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Jim Vilk
(Father & Uncle)

Here’s the Topps card I made of my dad. Since you could only use current MLB names, and since his Senators parent club was also called the Nationals, I picked them.

Also, this year I found a team photo with my Uncle Joe, when he played for the Uhlans of German Township High School. He went on to pitch in the Minors, winning 26 games in one season for Iola in the old KOM League.

Jimmer

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That’s all folks! Everyone have a Happy Father’s Day!